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Brexit negotiations

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241Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 18:59

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@wanderlust wrote:
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:Meanwhile the "leave the EU without a deal' petition has nearly reached half a million.
Make of that what you will.

That a lot of the same people who voted remain still want to remain?

Hardly a shock is it.
So by your logic, not many of the people who voted to leave still want to leave now that the facts are coming out?

Eh?

242Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 19:07

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
T.R.O.Y wrote:
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:I don’t think I could vote for something I thought was seriously damaging to the country. And don’t expect our politicians to.

But you vote labour?

Good gag.

Has there ever been a more damaging UK government than Cameron followed by May? An absolute disaster.

Blair and then brown?

243Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 20:04

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:I don’t think I could vote for something I thought was seriously damaging to the country. And don’t expect our politicians to.

But you vote labour?

Good gag.

Has there ever been a more damaging UK government than Cameron followed by May? An absolute disaster.

Blair and then brown?

Hardly. The greedy bankers fucked us not Blair and Brown.

244Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 22:46

gloswhite

gloswhite
Guðni Bergsson
Guðni Bergsson
It was Brown that relaxed the fiscal regulations that enabled the financial crash to have as bad an effect as it did. Need we say anything more about how duplicitous Blair was, and still is by guiding the EU on how to block all our attempts at negotiating a better Brexit.

245Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 22:55

Guest


Guest
Difficult to think of what more damage could have been done over the last last decade.

246Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 22:58

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
Brown relaxed the fiscal regulations at the urging of the bankers who then proceeded to almost bankrupt the country with their greed. Taxpayers had to spend billions bailing them out and they weren't even punished. The bankers were culpable, Brown was naive to believe them.

As for Blair what impact has he had on any negotiations with the EU?

247Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 22:59

gloswhite

gloswhite
Guðni Bergsson
Guðni Bergsson
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:I don’t think I could vote for something I thought was seriously damaging to the country. And don’t expect our politicians to.
No, they are voting for their own interpretations of what is right or wrong, whilst playing politics. But never mind that, my point is that the way everything has been handled shows, to me, that they haven't done anything good for the country, short or long term, and they have all done exactly the opposite of what they purported to do. Not all the mistakes and bad behaviour can be put at the PM's door.

I don't understand your point glos.

"Voting for their own interpretations of what is right or wrong" is what MPs should do. MPs are representatives not delegates. Normally the party system stops them from voting for what they think is right or wrong but May's shambolic brexit negotiations and Corbyn's posturing have broken at least temporarily this system.

I am not sure what you expect MPs to do.
My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. It is not democratic, and has damaged this country far more than if they had just accepted it, (and negotiate further when the new talks began). 
I accept they have a mind of their own, and should use it, however, the way they have conducted themselves with this issue, (all parties), they have made a much bigger problem for years to come, and nobody wins. Standing on your principles is always a costly exercise, but to do it at the cost of your countries standing in the world just isn't good enough.

248Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 23:04

gloswhite

gloswhite
Guðni Bergsson
Guðni Bergsson
@xmiles wrote:Brown relaxed the fiscal regulations at the urging of the bankers who then proceeded to almost bankrupt the country with their greed. Taxpayers had to spend billions bailing them out and they weren't even punished. The bankers were culpable, Brown was naive to believe them.

As for Blair what impact has he had on any negotiations with the EU?

Are you unaware that Blair has been advising the EU negotiators that because of the in-fighting with the Tories and Labours' sitting on the fence, that they only had to sit tight and the UK effort would crash in confusion and chaos.
I've seen him tackled on this twice on TV, and each time he admitted it, but of course put a different slant on it.
Letting Brown off by just calling him naive is a bit farcical isn't it? He let them off with far too much, and didn't step in when he should have.

249Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 23:07

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:I don’t think I could vote for something I thought was seriously damaging to the country. And don’t expect our politicians to.
No, they are voting for their own interpretations of what is right or wrong, whilst playing politics. But never mind that, my point is that the way everything has been handled shows, to me, that they haven't done anything good for the country, short or long term, and they have all done exactly the opposite of what they purported to do. Not all the mistakes and bad behaviour can be put at the PM's door.

I don't understand your point glos.

"Voting for their own interpretations of what is right or wrong" is what MPs should do. MPs are representatives not delegates. Normally the party system stops them from voting for what they think is right or wrong but May's shambolic brexit negotiations and Corbyn's posturing have broken at least temporarily this system.

I am not sure what you expect MPs to do.
My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. It is not democratic, and has damaged this country far more than if they had just accepted it, (and negotiate further when the new talks began). 
I accept they have a mind of their own, and should use it, however, the way they have conducted themselves with this issue, (all parties), they have made a much bigger problem for years to come, and nobody wins. Standing on your principles is always a costly exercise, but to do it at the cost of your countries standing in the world just isn't good enough.

But as I have said many times the electorate did not vote for a specific outcome. They voted for a range of outcomes ranging from a no deal brexit to a Norway style brexit.

MPs are just doing their job. It is not anti democratic to reject May's pathetic attempt at a deal. If brexiteers really believed in democracy they would welcome a second referendum. If they won that it would be game over. Oddly enough they resist asking people to vote now that they know what brexit really means and there is no £350m for the NHS, etc.

250Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Mar 23 2019, 23:13

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:Brown relaxed the fiscal regulations at the urging of the bankers who then proceeded to almost bankrupt the country with their greed. Taxpayers had to spend billions bailing them out and they weren't even punished. The bankers were culpable, Brown was naive to believe them.

As for Blair what impact has he had on any negotiations with the EU?

Are you unaware that Blair has been advising the EU negotiators that because of the in-fighting with the Tories and Labours' sitting on the fence, that they only had to sit tight and the UK effort would crash in confusion and chaos.
I've seen him tackled on this twice on TV, and each time he admitted it, but of course put a different slant on it.
Letting Brown off by just calling him naive is a bit farcical isn't it? He let them off with far too much, and didn't step in when he should have.

I am not letting Brown off just pointing out that the people who wrecked our economy with their greed were the bankers not Brown.

Do you really think the EU negotiators listen to Blair? Do you have any evidence to support this bizarre idea? With May leading the negotiations what did they have to worry about? She can't even get her own party to support her.

251Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 00:37

Sluffy

Sluffy
Admin
T.R.O.Y wrote:I don’t think I could vote for something I thought was seriously damaging to the country. And don’t expect our politicians to.

Well said.

My sentiment also.

252Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 09:38

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
T.R.O.Y wrote:Difficult to think of what more damage could have been done over the last last decade.

We could have spent billions in illegal wars and put the county into a massive recession. Could have had a run on a bank?

253Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 09:40

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:I don’t think I could vote for something I thought was seriously damaging to the country. And don’t expect our politicians to.
No, they are voting for their own interpretations of what is right or wrong, whilst playing politics. But never mind that, my point is that the way everything has been handled shows, to me, that they haven't done anything good for the country, short or long term, and they have all done exactly the opposite of what they purported to do. Not all the mistakes and bad behaviour can be put at the PM's door.

I don't understand your point glos.

"Voting for their own interpretations of what is right or wrong" is what MPs should do. MPs are representatives not delegates. Normally the party system stops them from voting for what they think is right or wrong but May's shambolic brexit negotiations and Corbyn's posturing have broken at least temporarily this system.

I am not sure what you expect MPs to do.
My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. It is not democratic, and has damaged this country far more than if they had just accepted it, (and negotiate further when the new talks began). 
I accept they have a mind of their own, and should use it, however, the way they have conducted themselves with this issue, (all parties), they have made a much bigger problem for years to come, and nobody wins. Standing on your principles is always a costly exercise, but to do it at the cost of your countries standing in the world just isn't good enough.

But as I have said many times the electorate did not vote for a specific outcome. They voted for a range of outcomes ranging from a no deal brexit to a Norway style brexit.

MPs are just doing their job. It is not anti democratic to reject May's pathetic attempt at a deal. If brexiteers really believed in democracy they would welcome a second referendum. If they won that it would be game over. Oddly enough they resist asking people to vote now that they know what brexit really means and there is no £350m for the NHS, etc.

Why would a second leave win be game over.

Aren't people allowed to change their minds

I can tell what would have been game over, a remain win.

254Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 09:41

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:Difficult to think of what more damage could have been done over the last last decade.

We could have spent billions in illegal wars and put the county into a massive recession. Could have had a run on a bank?

The greed of the bankers put the country into a massive recession.

255Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 09:55

Guest


Guest
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:Difficult to think of what more damage could have been done over the last last decade.

We could have spent billions in illegal wars and put the county into a massive recession. Could have had a run on a bank?

If you believe Labour caused a global recession then it's no wonder you're a Tory voter.

256Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 10:06

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@gloswhite wrote:My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. It is not democratic, and has damaged this country far more than if they had just accepted it, (and negotiate further when the new talks began). 
I accept they have a mind of their own, and should use it, however, the way they have conducted themselves with this issue, (all parties), they have made a much bigger problem for years to come, and nobody wins. Standing on your principles is always a costly exercise, but to do it at the cost of your countries standing in the world just isn't good enough.
I don't believe for one second that those who voted for Leave "wanted a specific outcome" as has been so eloquently argued by Hipster. The vague concept put to the electorate invariably meant that the Leave campaign garnered a huge amounts of votes from a wide range of voters who were united in the concept of "leaving the EU", but were and are still divided in how it should be achieved and what they think a post EU Britain should be.
As for our country's "standing in the world", we are a laughing stock already and have already taken a battering financially with far worse to come, but that is in part the fault of the politicians who were left with the unenviable task of reinterpreting what people actually voted for above and beyond the tired cliche, and then underlining their incompetence by playing politics and poor negotiation. Equally it is the fault of the Brexit concept itself which is internationally viewed as economic suicide thereby undermining confidence in the markets. And unfortunately, in a capitalist dominated world, confidence in the economy is a cornerstone of actual value.
The politicians have had a shocker, but the current situation isn't entirely their fault.

257Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 12:55

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
T.R.O.Y wrote:
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:
T.R.O.Y wrote:Difficult to think of what more damage could have been done over the last last decade.

We could have spent billions in illegal wars and put the county into a massive recession. Could have had a run on a bank?

If you believe Labour caused a global recession then it's no wonder you're a Tory voter.

They contributed to our lack of ability to react to it as a country. If you don't think they held any responsibility then no wonder you vote labour.

258Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 13:57

okocha

okocha
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
@wanderlust wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. It is not democratic, and has damaged this country far more than if they had just accepted it, (and negotiate further when the new talks began). 
I accept they have a mind of their own, and should use it, however, the way they have conducted themselves with this issue, (all parties), they have made a much bigger problem for years to come, and nobody wins. Standing on your principles is always a costly exercise, but to do it at the cost of your countries standing in the world just isn't good enough.
I don't believe for one second that those who voted for Leave "wanted a specific outcome" as has been so eloquently argued by Hipster. The vague concept put to the electorate invariably meant that the Leave campaign garnered a huge amounts of votes from a wide range of voters who were united in the concept of "leaving the EU", but were and are still divided in how it should be achieved and what they think a post EU Britain should be.
As for our country's "standing in the world", we are a laughing stock already and have already taken a battering financially with far worse to come, but that is in part the fault of the politicians who were left with the unenviable task of reinterpreting what people actually voted for above and beyond the tired cliche, and then underlining their incompetence by playing politics and poor negotiation. Equally it is the fault of the Brexit concept itself which is internationally viewed as economic suicide thereby undermining confidence in the markets. And unfortunately, in a capitalist dominated world, confidence in the economy is a cornerstone of actual value.
The politicians have had a shocker, but the current situation isn't entirely their fault.
Very good, Lusty.

The Maybot needs to look at Jacinda Ardern for a perfect example of what a true leader looks like. The vicar's daughter can't get even close to the innate humanity and love for others that Ardern demonstrates..... backed up by immediate, decisive action on gun laws. An example to all the world's leaders.

259Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 14:00

gloswhite

gloswhite
Guðni Bergsson
Guðni Bergsson
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:Brown relaxed the fiscal regulations at the urging of the bankers who then proceeded to almost bankrupt the country with their greed. Taxpayers had to spend billions bailing them out and they weren't even punished. The bankers were culpable, Brown was naive to believe them.

As for Blair what impact has he had on any negotiations with the EU?

Are you unaware that Blair has been advising the EU negotiators that because of the in-fighting with the Tories and Labours' sitting on the fence, that they only had to sit tight and the UK effort would crash in confusion and chaos.
I've seen him tackled on this twice on TV, and each time he admitted it, but of course put a different slant on it.
Letting Brown off by just calling him naive is a bit farcical isn't it? He let them off with far too much, and didn't step in when he should have.

I am not letting Brown off just pointing out that the people who wrecked our economy with their greed were the bankers not Brown.

Do you really think the EU negotiators listen to Blair? Do you have any evidence to support this bizarre idea? With May leading the negotiations what did they have to worry about? She can't even get her own party to support her.
Did you not read the part where I mentioned this? It was on the television when Andrew McNeill and later Andrew Marr raised the subject. Only bizarre in your world XM, a reality in everybody elses. As ever, don't let facts get in your way, (as you often tell us Brexiters)  Very Happy

260Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 14:11

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:Brown relaxed the fiscal regulations at the urging of the bankers who then proceeded to almost bankrupt the country with their greed. Taxpayers had to spend billions bailing them out and they weren't even punished. The bankers were culpable, Brown was naive to believe them.

As for Blair what impact has he had on any negotiations with the EU?

Are you unaware that Blair has been advising the EU negotiators that because of the in-fighting with the Tories and Labours' sitting on the fence, that they only had to sit tight and the UK effort would crash in confusion and chaos.
I've seen him tackled on this twice on TV, and each time he admitted it, but of course put a different slant on it.
Letting Brown off by just calling him naive is a bit farcical isn't it? He let them off with far too much, and didn't step in when he should have.

I am not letting Brown off just pointing out that the people who wrecked our economy with their greed were the bankers not Brown.

Do you really think the EU negotiators listen to Blair? Do you have any evidence to support this bizarre idea? With May leading the negotiations what did they have to worry about? She can't even get her own party to support her.
Did you not read the part where I mentioned this? It was on the television when Andrew McNeill and later Andrew Marr raised the subject. Only bizarre in your world XM, a reality in everybody elses. As ever, don't let facts get in your way, (as you often tell us Brexiters)  Very Happy

Just because Blair claims he said something to EU negotiators doesn't mean they took any notice of him. I asked you to provide evidence that they listened to him. You still haven't provided any evidence that they did or that Blair had any effect whatsoever on the EU negotiations. You haven't even given any details of what was said or when.

Just stick to the facts glos.

261Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 14:35

gloswhite

gloswhite
Guðni Bergsson
Guðni Bergsson
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:Brown relaxed the fiscal regulations at the urging of the bankers who then proceeded to almost bankrupt the country with their greed. Taxpayers had to spend billions bailing them out and they weren't even punished. The bankers were culpable, Brown was naive to believe them.

As for Blair what impact has he had on any negotiations with the EU?

Are you unaware that Blair has been advising the EU negotiators that because of the in-fighting with the Tories and Labours' sitting on the fence, that they only had to sit tight and the UK effort would crash in confusion and chaos.
I've seen him tackled on this twice on TV, and each time he admitted it, but of course put a different slant on it.
Letting Brown off by just calling him naive is a bit farcical isn't it? He let them off with far too much, and didn't step in when he should have.

I am not letting Brown off just pointing out that the people who wrecked our economy with their greed were the bankers not Brown.

Do you really think the EU negotiators listen to Blair? Do you have any evidence to support this bizarre idea? With May leading the negotiations what did they have to worry about? She can't even get her own party to support her.
Did you not read the part where I mentioned this? It was on the television when Andrew McNeill and later Andrew Marr raised the subject. Only bizarre in your world XM, a reality in everybody elses. As ever, don't let facts get in your way, (as you often tell us Brexiters)  Very Happy

Just because Blair claims he said something to EU negotiators doesn't mean they took any notice of him. I asked you to provide evidence that they listened to him. You still haven't provided any evidence that they did or that Blair had any effect whatsoever on the EU negotiations. You haven't even given any details of what was said or when.

Just stick to the facts glos.
Are you for real?  What I saw and heard was a fact. What they asked him was a fact. His inability to deny it was a fact.
How can anyone provide such evidence, but I find it odd that the EU have done exactly as it has been described by those two commentators, to the letter. I've no need to tell lies, and never have.
Lets let this go XM, You haven't got the ability to accept anything that goes against your blinkered view, and I can't be bothered with you seemingly going down the old TROY route of asking for evidence for everything, it's too wearing.

262Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 14:45

gloswhite

gloswhite
Guðni Bergsson
Guðni Bergsson
@wanderlust wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. 
I don't believe for one second that those who voted for Leave "wanted a specific outcome" 
What a stupid comment. The specific outcome was to leave the EU. How can that be anything other than specific? 
We didn't vote for what deal we wanted, we voted to either stay in or come out. Seems pretty specific to me.

263Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 15:30

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@gloswhite wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. 
I don't believe for one second that those who voted for Leave "wanted a specific outcome" 
What a stupid comment. The specific outcome was to leave the EU. How can that be anything other than specific? 
We didn't vote for what deal we wanted, we voted to either stay in or come out. Seems pretty specific to me.

To leave on what terms?

The terms were never specified which is why the vote is not specific , it is completely vague. Which is why we are in the mess we are in now.

264Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 15:35

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:Brown relaxed the fiscal regulations at the urging of the bankers who then proceeded to almost bankrupt the country with their greed. Taxpayers had to spend billions bailing them out and they weren't even punished. The bankers were culpable, Brown was naive to believe them.

As for Blair what impact has he had on any negotiations with the EU?

Are you unaware that Blair has been advising the EU negotiators that because of the in-fighting with the Tories and Labours' sitting on the fence, that they only had to sit tight and the UK effort would crash in confusion and chaos.
I've seen him tackled on this twice on TV, and each time he admitted it, but of course put a different slant on it.
Letting Brown off by just calling him naive is a bit farcical isn't it? He let them off with far too much, and didn't step in when he should have.

I am not letting Brown off just pointing out that the people who wrecked our economy with their greed were the bankers not Brown.

Do you really think the EU negotiators listen to Blair? Do you have any evidence to support this bizarre idea? With May leading the negotiations what did they have to worry about? She can't even get her own party to support her.
Did you not read the part where I mentioned this? It was on the television when Andrew McNeill and later Andrew Marr raised the subject. Only bizarre in your world XM, a reality in everybody elses. As ever, don't let facts get in your way, (as you often tell us Brexiters)  Very Happy

Just because Blair claims he said something to EU negotiators doesn't mean they took any notice of him. I asked you to provide evidence that they listened to him. You still haven't provided any evidence that they did or that Blair had any effect whatsoever on the EU negotiations. You haven't even given any details of what was said or when.

Just stick to the facts glos.
Are you for real?  What I saw and heard was a fact. What they asked him was a fact. His inability to deny it was a fact.
How can anyone provide such evidence, but I find it odd that the EU have done exactly as it has been described by those two commentators, to the letter. I've no need to tell lies, and never have.
Lets let this go XM, You haven't got the ability to accept anything that goes against your blinkered view, and I can't be bothered with you seemingly going down the old TROY route of asking for evidence for everything, it's too wearing.

Just asserting something doesn't make it a fact. There is no evidence that anything Blair said had any impact on the EU negotiations. Frankly does anybody listen to Blair these days?

265Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 16:42

Guest


Guest
Haven’t read this back and forth, but noticed my name come up. If you hold a strong opinion on anything and claim to have supporting evidence you should be prepared to present it. Completely unreasonable to get annoyed when asked to do so.

266Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 19:05

gloswhite

gloswhite
Guðni Bergsson
Guðni Bergsson
Thats it. I'm stepping back from this as I can feel myself getting more and more angry, and I've more important things to take up my time.  
Lets see what happens over the next couple of weeks or so, and then we can all bemoan what could and should have happened, and how we can move forward. It'll be far more productive than this sniping.

267Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 21:00

wessy

wessy
El Hadji Diouf
El Hadji Diouf
Not sure if i have been asleep but i thought since 2010 we have had a Tory/Liberal then Tory government? yet despite Brexit only appearing in 2016 it would seem that previous Labour leaders are culpable, why would Blair or Brown have any significance.

Here's the rub the Tory party have had a boil to lance over Europe for 40 years, it needed a prick, that prick came in the form of Cameron who played a blinder and passed this crock of shit onto May, who managed to make a bad situation even worse. This is a problem of the Tory party, started by them, and as they are the party in government the present situation is owned by them.

268Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 22:11

xmiles

xmiles
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@wessy wrote:Not sure if i have been asleep but i thought since 2010 we have had a Tory/Liberal then Tory government? yet despite Brexit only appearing in 2016 it would seem that previous Labour leaders are culpable, why would Blair or Brown have any significance.

Here's the rub the Tory party have had a boil to lance over Europe for 40 years, it needed a prick, that prick came in the form of Cameron who played a blinder and passed this crock of shit onto May, who managed to make a bad situation even worse. This is a problem of the Tory party, started by them, and as they are the party in government the present situation is owned by them.

:clap:

269Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Mar 24 2019, 23:38

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@gloswhite wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:My point XM is that their electorate wanted a specific outcome, and they have interpreted that instruction in a way that does not reflect the original request. 
I don't believe for one second that those who voted for Leave "wanted a specific outcome" 
What a stupid comment. The specific outcome was to leave the EU. How can that be anything other than specific? 
We didn't vote for what deal we wanted, we voted to either stay in or come out. Seems pretty specific to me.
Specific like blokes voting to have a dick that reaches the ground? Happy to vote for it, not so happy when they were booked in for the operation to have their legs amputated.

270Brexit negotiations - Page 9 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Mon Mar 25 2019, 08:31

okocha

okocha
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
Brexit negotiations - Page 9 54800205_10161552044590537_348887868560637952_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_ht=scontent-lht6-1

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