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Boris Johnson to be our next Prime Minister?

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Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Dunkels King wrote:
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:The mail is edited by a remainer.
...but the people who pay him aren´t. They dictate the agenda.

Obviously not as the tone of the paper changed completely when he took over.

This included their full throated backing for Mrs may and the compete derision of the erg.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@T.R.O.Y wrote:It’s not biased to point out the tariffs are up to 46% - its a statement of fact Glos.
Agreed TROY, but there's more to it than just to say tariffs are up, down, or whatever. There is usually a reason for raising tariffs, and this is because our product is usually competing with the home product. If that is the case, why not look for new markets, especially when you know your product is successful?  Nothing stands still, especially in business, and we need to be able to adapt to the changes, and until we do, things will get a lot tougher, with the benefits materializing 3,4, or more years down the line.
We survived the financial crisis and came out stronger, why can we not survive the Brexit changes ?

The problem is that the benefits you talk about glos are imaginary as opposed to the real benefits we get from being in the EU. Trump and his ambassador have already told us what kind of trade deal we will get from them: we will have to accept their shockingly low food standards (chlorinated chicken, hormone stuffed beef, etc) and open up the NHS to them.
The benefits we get from the EU are good, but its a two way street, and one in which they benefit far more than we do. When we add to that the lock-in we have to suffer for these presumed benefits, who knows whether the EU is the best long-term option for us? I personally would like to see the UK face its future on its own merits, not those handed down from a trading partner that believes itself to be a government.
As for the food trade, and NHS, at this stage you are doing nothing more than listening, and repeating, unfounded allegations.

Sadly these are not "unfounded allegations". The US ambassador Woody Johnson, who is a close friend of the US president, recently said the NHS "would be on the table" and “there will have to be some deal where you give the British people a choice ...to buy it [chlorinated chicken]”. Nothing imaginary about that.
XM, I don't know about you, but I see such comments as the opening gambit of what will be hard negotiations. 
As I've said previously, the UK already has very high standards for its food and animal care, and it is on that basis that we manage to export to countries that can easily produce its own meat products, but prefers ours. Were not going to throw it all away, it would be foolish, and costly.
With regards the NHS, as much as we love it, it falls down on many fronts. An injection of cash and improved services wouldn't be a bad thing. Again, we won't be handing it over to the Americans, so lets wait and see what is on offer. You seem to think they will make us do as they bid. I don't know why.

The major flaw in what you say is that you completely ignore the relative weakness of our negotiating position with the USA once we leave the EU. We will be desperate for a trade deal and even if we were not the USA is much stronger and powerful economically than we are. There is no way that they are not going to insist on us accepting their lower food standards if we want a trade deal.

As for your idea that further privatisation of the NHS is going to improve matters, that is so far from reality that you must be ignoring all the evidence of how inefficient the American health system is. It is the most expensive in the world and yet life expectancy in the USA is significantly lower than any EU country.

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Do people not eat when they travel to America? The food is always terrific and I've never been sick.

Been a while since I've been I admit but I simply don't understand the problem.

Natasha Whittam

Natasha Whittam
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
There isn't a problem, Xmiles just likes to focus on one thing and spend the next 3 years banging on about it.

Those who follow my work will know I lived in America for 3 years and, like you say, the food was magnificent.

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
Farage is currently writing gags for Jim Davidson, on the side. He was considering doing a slot at the Saturday night Palladium.

Angry Dad

Angry Dad
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
Love the fat carts in Wallmart.

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Angry Dad wrote:Love the fat carts in Wallmart.

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:
@T.R.O.Y wrote:It’s not biased to point out the tariffs are up to 46% - its a statement of fact Glos.
Agreed TROY, but there's more to it than just to say tariffs are up, down, or whatever. There is usually a reason for raising tariffs, and this is because our product is usually competing with the home product. If that is the case, why not look for new markets, especially when you know your product is successful?  Nothing stands still, especially in business, and we need to be able to adapt to the changes, and until we do, things will get a lot tougher, with the benefits materializing 3,4, or more years down the line.
We survived the financial crisis and came out stronger, why can we not survive the Brexit changes ?

The problem is that the benefits you talk about glos are imaginary as opposed to the real benefits we get from being in the EU. Trump and his ambassador have already told us what kind of trade deal we will get from them: we will have to accept their shockingly low food standards (chlorinated chicken, hormone stuffed beef, etc) and open up the NHS to them.
The benefits we get from the EU are good, but its a two way street, and one in which they benefit far more than we do. When we add to that the lock-in we have to suffer for these presumed benefits, who knows whether the EU is the best long-term option for us? I personally would like to see the UK face its future on its own merits, not those handed down from a trading partner that believes itself to be a government.
As for the food trade, and NHS, at this stage you are doing nothing more than listening, and repeating, unfounded allegations.

Sadly these are not "unfounded allegations". The US ambassador Woody Johnson, who is a close friend of the US president, recently said the NHS "would be on the table" and “there will have to be some deal where you give the British people a choice ...to buy it [chlorinated chicken]”. Nothing imaginary about that.
XM, I don't know about you, but I see such comments as the opening gambit of what will be hard negotiations. 
As I've said previously, the UK already has very high standards for its food and animal care, and it is on that basis that we manage to export to countries that can easily produce its own meat products, but prefers ours. Were not going to throw it all away, it would be foolish, and costly.
With regards the NHS, as much as we love it, it falls down on many fronts. An injection of cash and improved services wouldn't be a bad thing. Again, we won't be handing it over to the Americans, so lets wait and see what is on offer. You seem to think they will make us do as they bid. I don't know why.

The major flaw in what you say is that you completely ignore the relative weakness of our negotiating position with the USA once we leave the EU. We will be desperate for a trade deal and even if we were not the USA is much stronger and powerful economically than we are. There is no way that they are not going to insist on us accepting their lower food standards if we want a trade deal.

As for your idea that further privatisation of the NHS is going to improve matters, that is so far from reality that you must be ignoring all the evidence of how inefficient the American health system is. It is the most expensive in the world and yet life expectancy in the USA is significantly lower than any EU country.
I agree that the medical services in America are expensive. I was due to go there after Obamacare started, and my insurance went up from about £250 to £800 for just over two weeks. My daughter.
I never went, and haven't been since. Shame, as I've been a few times, and really liked it.

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
I forgot to omit the part about my daughter, but she needed the medical services when she was in the USA with work, and she had every test under the sun in order to find what was wrong. They did find it, and she was treated, but she felt that because it was paid for by the insurance company, they went completely over the top.
My sister in Germany says everybody gets everything, whether they want it or not, in Germany, because of the insurance companies insistence.

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
Do you think Hitler would have been stopped with a milk-shake?

okocha

okocha
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
This is an interesting development, rather deflating the Government's idea of banking on a deal with the erratic USA:-

"A US-UK trade deal will not get through Congress if Brexit undermines the Good Friday Agreement, the Speaker of the US House of Representatives has said.
Democrat Nancy Pelosi, whose party controls the House, said the UK's exit from the EU could not be allowed to endanger the Irish peace deal."

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
So much for the fantasy deal with the US.

Boris is already blaming remainers for "collaborating" with the EU.

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
Trump wont give Britain a good deal.MAGA.The Gammons are sinking the country.
The Tories will tailor everything after Brexit to hurt the working class, as they always do, and to help the wealthy.
A Tory no-deal Brexit ( many people did not vote for a no-deal Brexit ). There is nothing advantageous about Brexit, its all loss on many levels.
Imbeciles.

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@okocha wrote:This is an interesting development, rather deflating the Government's idea of banking on a deal with the erratic USA:-

"A US-UK trade deal will not get through Congress if Brexit undermines the Good Friday Agreement, the Speaker of the US House of Representatives has said.
Democrat Nancy Pelosi, whose party controls the House, said the UK's exit from the EU could not be allowed to endanger the Irish peace deal."

Why is there a danger to peace?

Who's threatening violence? Certainly not the British government.

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@xmiles wrote:So much for the fantasy deal with the US.

Boris is already blaming remainers for "collaborating" with the EU.

They are. Remainers have gone to Brussels many many times to "discuss" brexit. They don't want to it to happen. What do you think they discuss?

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
The right are now trying to justify No Deal by posting videos of remainers talking about it before the referendum. That apparently means leave voters knew they were voting for no deal, because the opposition said it could happen, don’t believe the other stuff that’s just project fear... Almost like they’re desperate:

https://twitter.com/change_britain/status/1161553730996711424?s=21

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Brexit won't happen. Let's see what the people think of that in the election that is coming up.

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
The Yanks are saying that to get a trade deal we'll have to accept US food standards. Lovely.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@boltonbonce wrote:The Yanks are saying that to get a trade deal we'll have to accept US food standards. Lovely.

I posted a link at 317.

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
Presume all leavers will be outraged at the prospect of unelected figures trying to dictate rules to old Blighty??

Surely?

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Do people not eat when they go to America. I never got a reply. I assume they don't considering it's clearly dangerous.

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:Do people not eat when they go to America. I never got a reply. I assume they don't considering it's clearly dangerous.
Americans clearly enjoy their food, judging by the average size of them. They need to look at their portion sizes. When I ordered a salad, I got what looked like the New Forest on a plate.
As for the cheese.........

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I don't think they'll be dictating portion size. 

Also, will there no longer be choice? 

People are speaking as if American food will be the only thing on the shelf. If you don't like it, avoid it.

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Have you tried their chocolate? Yuk.
On a slightly different note, I think I know why people are panicking about Brexit. They can't help it.
In my local area recently, the water authority warned that the water supply would be turned off for a period of up to three hours on the coming Thursday, in order to facilitate pipe repairs.
Well, the reaction was unbelievable. We had people talking about filling the bath on Wednesday in order to have a supply to hand. Others wanted bottled water handed out.
At one point I thought they'd start asking for Anderson shelters. What's happened to us?

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:Do people not eat when they go to America. I never got a reply. I assume they don't considering it's clearly dangerous.

The point isn't whether it's dangerous, there's evidence to support both sides of that, either opinion can be justified.

The issue is we're in danger of having our regulations dictated by an unelected foreign power, which was, of course, a key reason to leave the EU. So why are you not kicking off about it?

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Why should we lower our standards? They should raise theirs.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:Do people not eat when they go to America. I never got a reply. I assume they don't considering it's clearly dangerous.

This article explains the concern about chlorine washed chicken.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47440562

It is not just the chicken. The Americans have far lower food hygiene and safety standards than the EU as this article shows:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwi2vqrNwoTkAhUBsXEKHYDGBSwQFjACegQIAhAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Finews.co.uk%2Fnews%2Fuk%2Fchlorinated-chicken-food-standards-us-not-need-imported%2F&usg=AOvVaw0niWHvQKwpTqsjT-jFy4SE

And as for the bogus "choice" argument, how will you know where the chicken in a supermarket or restaurant has come from? American food standards don't require this kind of information to be provided.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@Hipster_Nebula wrote:I don't think they'll be dictating portion size. 

Also, will there no longer be choice? 

People are speaking as if American food will be the only thing on the shelf. If you don't like it, avoid it.

You won't know where it comes from once we adopt American food standards so how can you avoid it?

Hipster_Nebula

Hipster_Nebula
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Why wouldn't you? 

Would we no longer stock British meat?

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