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211Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Fri Nov 15 2019, 00:08

Hip Priest

Hip Priest
Tony Kelly
Tony Kelly
I'm just in the middle of a free trial of Kindle Unlimited on Amazon which I have to say is pretty good. Just downloaded the book Boncey was asking about (Relegation Form) for free.

212Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 17 2019, 12:35

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I was given a couple of books yesterday: "Ah'm tellin' thee" - a Tommy Banks biography and "Walking down the Manny Road" by Doug Mitchell.

213Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Fri Nov 22 2019, 15:23

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

214Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sat Nov 23 2019, 14:45

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@sunlight wrote:Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
I know it's generally characterised as being primarily about a young woman feeling trapped and becoming adulterous - which caused a scandal at the time - but underpinning the story is a hefty dose of French realism, itself a departure from the (unrealistic) romanticism that preceded it, so if that floats your boat you might be interested in Balzac and Proust who were Flaubert's main influences. Balzac in particular is a great storyteller in the Dickensian style.
Also, a hundred and twenty years before MB, L'Abbe Prevost wrote Manon Lescaut which has a lot of the same elements as MB and IMO is a better rendition despite L'Abbe having to rewrite and tone down the scandalous bits in the second edition. Check them out.

215Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sat Nov 23 2019, 15:46

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
I know it's generally characterised as being primarily about a young woman feeling trapped and becoming adulterous - which caused a scandal at the time - but underpinning the story is a hefty dose of French realism, itself a departure from the (unrealistic) romanticism that preceded it, so if that floats your boat you might be interested in Balzac and Proust who were Flaubert's main influences. Balzac in particular is a great storyteller in the Dickensian style.
Also, a hundred and twenty years before MB, L'Abbe Prevost wrote Manon Lescaut which has a lot of the same elements as MB and IMO is a better rendition despite L'Abbe having to rewrite and tone down the scandalous bits in the second edition. Check them out.

I am impressed. You know your stuff. The book I have half read, so far, over the last week and a half, when I have had the time and will, is Hard Times by Dickens. It is my first read of Dickens and it is really really grim. I enjoyed one quote, it was along the lines of " the town was built half by God and half by man, and most of Gods half had been bricked up " Laughing . I need to finish this one off, actually, before I commence the extremely interesting Madame Bovary in Hardback that I have purchased. They say that a book always lands just when you need it. I have read the introduction of it and the wiki of it. I am impressed you know lots about all of this genre.

216Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 02:17

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@sunlight wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
I know it's generally characterised as being primarily about a young woman feeling trapped and becoming adulterous - which caused a scandal at the time - but underpinning the story is a hefty dose of French realism, itself a departure from the (unrealistic) romanticism that preceded it, so if that floats your boat you might be interested in Balzac and Proust who were Flaubert's main influences. Balzac in particular is a great storyteller in the Dickensian style.
Also, a hundred and twenty years before MB, L'Abbe Prevost wrote Manon Lescaut which has a lot of the same elements as MB and IMO is a better rendition despite L'Abbe having to rewrite and tone down the scandalous bits in the second edition. Check them out.

I am impressed. You know your stuff. The book I have half read, so far, over the last week and a half, when I have had the time and will, is Hard Times by Dickens. It is my first read of Dickens and it is really really grim. I enjoyed one quote, it was along the lines of " the town was built half by God and half by man, and most of Gods half had been bricked up " Laughing . I need to finish this one off, actually, before I commence the extremely interesting Madame Bovary in Hardback that I have purchased. They say that a book always lands just when you need it. I have read the introduction of it and the wiki of it. I am impressed you know lots about all of this genre.
French Literature A level donkey's years ago TBH.
Dickens is class but you might have started off with something a bit lighter than Hard Times- the clue is in the title Smile Mercifully, it's quite a short novel. The deal is - as with the aforementioned French writers - social realism, so they set good stories in the context of the struggle for survival that everyone bar the rich had to cope with  during the 18th and 19th centuries. Even so, most of their books tend to focus on those people lucky enough to have some form of employment, shit as it was. Given the excessive amount of glamourisation of those periods, these writers are one of the few sources of information about how life really was back then - unrelenting poverty and hunger for most and an average lifespan of half what it is today.
Back then, there wasn't much money in painting or writing about the poor so it didn't happen often.

As an aside, when I did French Literature, we did it in the original French and it never crossed my mind that I was learning to speak like a bloke from the 18th century - I do get a few laughs when I'm speaking to French folk.

217Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 09:49

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
I know it's generally characterised as being primarily about a young woman feeling trapped and becoming adulterous - which caused a scandal at the time - but underpinning the story is a hefty dose of French realism, itself a departure from the (unrealistic) romanticism that preceded it, so if that floats your boat you might be interested in Balzac and Proust who were Flaubert's main influences. Balzac in particular is a great storyteller in the Dickensian style.
Also, a hundred and twenty years before MB, L'Abbe Prevost wrote Manon Lescaut which has a lot of the same elements as MB and IMO is a better rendition despite L'Abbe having to rewrite and tone down the scandalous bits in the second edition. Check them out.

I am impressed. You know your stuff. The book I have half read, so far, over the last week and a half, when I have had the time and will, is Hard Times by Dickens. It is my first read of Dickens and it is really really grim. I enjoyed one quote, it was along the lines of " the town was built half by God and half by man, and most of Gods half had been bricked up " Laughing . I need to finish this one off, actually, before I commence the extremely interesting Madame Bovary in Hardback that I have purchased. They say that a book always lands just when you need it. I have read the introduction of it and the wiki of it. I am impressed you know lots about all of this genre.
French Literature A level donkey's years ago TBH.
Dickens is class but you might have started off with something a bit lighter than Hard Times- the clue is in the title Smile Mercifully, it's quite a short novel. The deal is - as with the aforementioned French writers - social realism, so they set good stories in the context of the struggle for survival that everyone bar the rich had to cope with  during the 18th and 19th centuries. Even so, most of their books tend to focus on those people lucky enough to have some form of employment, shit as it was. Given the excessive amount of glamourisation of those periods, these writers are one of the few sources of information about how life really was back then - unrelenting poverty and hunger for most and an average lifespan of half what it is today.
Back then, there wasn't much money in painting or writing about the poor so it didn't happen often.

As an aside, when I did French Literature, we did it in the original French and it never crossed my mind that I was learning to speak like a bloke from the 18th century - I do get a few laughs when I'm speaking to French folk.

It has cheered me up that not all Dickens books are as grim as this one as I wish to read his classic ones and they are really long. I did French language at school for five years but only English books in Literature lessons. It is amusing about you saying you spoke like a nineteenth Century French person. What you are saying about the poor never being written about in that period has enlightened myself about the idea of Victorians in England always being portrayed in a certain way, the middle and upper classes. An interesting reply and I thank you for it.

218Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 13:03

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@sunlight wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
I know it's generally characterised as being primarily about a young woman feeling trapped and becoming adulterous - which caused a scandal at the time - but underpinning the story is a hefty dose of French realism, itself a departure from the (unrealistic) romanticism that preceded it, so if that floats your boat you might be interested in Balzac and Proust who were Flaubert's main influences. Balzac in particular is a great storyteller in the Dickensian style.
Also, a hundred and twenty years before MB, L'Abbe Prevost wrote Manon Lescaut which has a lot of the same elements as MB and IMO is a better rendition despite L'Abbe having to rewrite and tone down the scandalous bits in the second edition. Check them out.

I am impressed. You know your stuff. The book I have half read, so far, over the last week and a half, when I have had the time and will, is Hard Times by Dickens. It is my first read of Dickens and it is really really grim. I enjoyed one quote, it was along the lines of " the town was built half by God and half by man, and most of Gods half had been bricked up " Laughing . I need to finish this one off, actually, before I commence the extremely interesting Madame Bovary in Hardback that I have purchased. They say that a book always lands just when you need it. I have read the introduction of it and the wiki of it. I am impressed you know lots about all of this genre.
French Literature A level donkey's years ago TBH.
Dickens is class but you might have started off with something a bit lighter than Hard Times- the clue is in the title Smile Mercifully, it's quite a short novel. The deal is - as with the aforementioned French writers - social realism, so they set good stories in the context of the struggle for survival that everyone bar the rich had to cope with  during the 18th and 19th centuries. Even so, most of their books tend to focus on those people lucky enough to have some form of employment, shit as it was. Given the excessive amount of glamourisation of those periods, these writers are one of the few sources of information about how life really was back then - unrelenting poverty and hunger for most and an average lifespan of half what it is today.
Back then, there wasn't much money in painting or writing about the poor so it didn't happen often.

As an aside, when I did French Literature, we did it in the original French and it never crossed my mind that I was learning to speak like a bloke from the 18th century - I do get a few laughs when I'm speaking to French folk.

It has cheered me up that not all Dickens books are as grim as this one as I wish to read his classic ones and they are really long. I did French language at school for five years but only English books in Literature lessons. It is amusing about you saying you spoke like a nineteenth Century French person. What you are saying about the poor never being written about in that period has enlightened myself about the idea of Victorians in England always being portrayed in a certain way, the middle and upper classes. An interesting reply and I thank you for it.
Here you go...a one page history of poverty in England since the Middle Ages.
Worth a quick look as it provides context - and highlights the distorted/romanticised view of our history.

219Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 13:50

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
A Chinese friend of mine told me that a few of his relatives back home learned English with the help of BBC radio. 
They used to listen to the old panel show 'Just A Minute'. When they finally visited him over here, most of them sounded like Kenneth Williams.

220Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 14:57

okocha

okocha
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
Balzac's Le Pere Goriot is awesome! Don't want to spoil it for you if you haven't read it, but there's a vividly detailed description of a revenge castration in there.....not right at the end and not gratuitous....so enjoy!!

221Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 16:25

Cajunboy

Cajunboy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@sunlight wrote:Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
I know it's generally characterised as being primarily about a young woman feeling trapped and becoming adulterous - which caused a scandal at the time - but underpinning the story is a hefty dose of French realism, itself a departure from the (unrealistic) romanticism that preceded it, so if that floats your boat you might be interested in Balzac and Proust who were Flaubert's main influences. Balzac in particular is a great storyteller in the Dickensian style.
Also, a hundred and twenty years before MB, L'Abbe Prevost wrote Manon Lescaut which has a lot of the same elements as MB and IMO is a better rendition despite L'Abbe having to rewrite and tone down the scandalous bits in the second edition. Check them out.

I am impressed. You know your stuff. The book I have half read, so far, over the last week and a half, when I have had the time and will, is Hard Times by Dickens. It is my first read of Dickens and it is really really grim. I enjoyed one quote, it was along the lines of " the town was built half by God and half by man, and most of Gods half had been bricked up " Laughing . I need to finish this one off, actually, before I commence the extremely interesting Madame Bovary in Hardback that I have purchased. They say that a book always lands just when you need it. I have read the introduction of it and the wiki of it. I am impressed you know lots about all of this genre.
French Literature A level donkey's years ago TBH.
Dickens is class but you might have started off with something a bit lighter than Hard Times- the clue is in the title Smile Mercifully, it's quite a short novel. The deal is - as with the aforementioned French writers - social realism, so they set good stories in the context of the struggle for survival that everyone bar the rich had to cope with  during the 18th and 19th centuries. Even so, most of their books tend to focus on those people lucky enough to have some form of employment, shit as it was. Given the excessive amount of glamourisation of those periods, these writers are one of the few sources of information about how life really was back then - unrelenting poverty and hunger for most and an average lifespan of half what it is today.
Back then, there wasn't much money in painting or writing about the poor so it didn't happen often.

As an aside, when I did French Literature, we did it in the original French and it never crossed my mind that I was learning to speak like a bloke from the 18th century - I do get a few laughs when I'm speaking to French folk.

It has cheered me up that not all Dickens books are as grim as this one as I wish to read his classic ones and they are really long. I did French language at school for five years but only English books in Literature lessons. It is amusing about you saying you spoke like a nineteenth Century French person. What you are saying about the poor never being written about in that period has enlightened myself about the idea of Victorians in England always being portrayed in a certain way, the middle and upper classes. An interesting reply and I thank you for it.
Here you go...a one page history of poverty in England since the Middle Ages.
Worth a quick look as it provides context - and highlights the distorted/romanticised view of our history.
Just downloaded the PDF of history of poverty. Very interesting reading. A far cry from the snowflake, gender fluid, twitter world we live in now.

222Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 18:40

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Have you read 'The Classic Slum:Salford Life in the First Quarter of the Century'? 

It's a brilliant read. Written by Robert Roberts, it's straight from the horses mouth.

223Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 18:49

Cajunboy

Cajunboy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
Thanks.

Just bought it on ebay for £2.45 ( includes postage)

224Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 21:22

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@boltonbonce wrote:Have you read 'The Classic Slum:Salford Life in the First Quarter of the Century'? 

It's a brilliant read. Written by Robert Roberts, it's straight from the horses mouth.

No doubt it would act as a memory of all those people in the UK that have lost their lives in Wetherspoons, so that it may never be repeated.

225Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 21:35

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@okocha wrote:Balzac's Le Pere Goriot is awesome! Don't want to spoil it for you if you haven't read it, but there's a vividly detailed description of a revenge castration in there.....not right at the end and not gratuitous....so enjoy!!

I often read Les Fleurs du Mal by Charles Baudelaire. My favourite is `Le Soleil` with the line, in one of the variations " the Sun beat down mercilessly upon the rooves", or Quand le soleil cruel frappe à traits redoublés
Sur la ville et les champs, sur les toits et les blés ( when the cruel Sun strikes with increased blows the City the country the roofs and the wheatfields ). That line puts you there in so few words, you are there with him experiencing that moment. In the fierce rays of noon, which mercilessly beat On town and country, on the roofs and on the wheat. Several variations.

226Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 21:47

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@boltonbonce wrote:A Chinese friend of mine told me that a few of his relatives back home learned English with the help of BBC radio. 
They used to listen to the old panel show 'Just A Minute'. When they finally visited him over here, most of them sounded like Kenneth Williams.
It can happen. My French has far too many "forsooths" in it apparently. The plummiest English I ever heard came out of a Gujerati warehouse manager in Qatar - who insisted on wearing a bowler hat and carrying an umbrella in the desert. He wasn't daft mind.

227Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 21:50

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@wanderlust wrote:
@boltonbonce wrote:A Chinese friend of mine told me that a few of his relatives back home learned English with the help of BBC radio. 
They used to listen to the old panel show 'Just A Minute'. When they finally visited him over here, most of them sounded like Kenneth Williams.
It can happen. My French has far too many "forsooths" in it apparently. The plummiest English I ever heard came out of a Gujerati warehouse manager in Qatar - who insisted on wearing a bowler hat and carrying an umbrella in the desert. He wasn't daft mind.

People were better then. Thats all been lost now and it made us special.

228Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 21:54

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@sunlight wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
@boltonbonce wrote:A Chinese friend of mine told me that a few of his relatives back home learned English with the help of BBC radio. 
They used to listen to the old panel show 'Just A Minute'. When they finally visited him over here, most of them sounded like Kenneth Williams.
It can happen. My French has far too many "forsooths" in it apparently. The plummiest English I ever heard came out of a Gujerati warehouse manager in Qatar - who insisted on wearing a bowler hat and carrying an umbrella in the desert. He wasn't daft mind.

People were better then. Thats all been lost now and it made us special.
You are definitely bonkers, albeit in a nice way.

229Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Nov 24 2019, 22:33

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
I dont mean the bowler hat and umbrella. I mean the way that English people spoke. I much prefer it like we spoke in those old black and white films. But not the cockney thing, not the " Oh there was a right old Bull and Cow going on ", I mean proper English. Shakespeare was the best language of all.

230Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Mon Nov 25 2019, 16:53

Cajunboy

Cajunboy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
@sunlight wrote:I dont mean the bowler hat and umbrella. I mean the way that English people spoke. I much prefer it like we spoke in those old black and white films. But not the cockney thing, not the " Oh there was a right old Bull and Cow going on ", I mean proper English. Shakespeare was the best language of all.
What,  like Danny Dyer?

231Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Mon Nov 25 2019, 21:22

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
I dont know who Danny Dyer is.

232Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Tue Nov 26 2019, 02:17

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@sunlight wrote:I dont know who Danny Dyer is.
You're not missing anything.

233Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sat Nov 30 2019, 10:42

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@boltonbonce wrote:A Chinese friend of mine told me that a few of his relatives back home learned English with the help of BBC radio. 
They used to listen to the old panel show 'Just A Minute'. When they finally visited him over here, most of them sounded like Kenneth Williams.

If they come over here for work they will do a good phone interview.

234Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sat Nov 30 2019, 15:15

wanderlust

wanderlust
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Just been loading up my Kindle with free books for my holiday - a mixture of historical stuff, classics and thrillers but I spotted an academic book that's a bargain if you don't mind a heavy going read: Globalisation and Capitalist Geopolitics: Sovereignty and State Power in a Multipolar World.
Saw this when it came out but was originally priced at £90 so I passed - but now it's free on Kindle!
I'll let you know if I managed to plough through it when I get back next month. Preface:
"Globalization and Capitalist Geopolitics is concerned with the nature of corporate power against the backdrop of the decline of the West and the struggle by non-western states to challenge and overcome domination of the rest of the world by the West."

Should be interesting.

235Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sat Feb 01 2020, 12:51

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
The Boy From Tomorrow by Camille Deangelis.

Aimed at the younger market, but a great read.

236Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Sun Feb 02 2020, 14:09

sunlight

sunlight
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
Not about a book, but a comparison of Greggs Pasties with Bruegels painting of the medieval land of Gluttony and Sloth. It is a land where food presents itself for eating. Eggs have legs and they walk up to people offering themselves to be eaten. Chickens and Turkeys walk up and lay themselves down on plates. Roasted and dinner ready Pigs run around with knives already in them. The roofs of the houses are made from pies and pastry that is open and ready for roasted pigeons to fly themselves into them. Its a sixteenth century painting from a Dutch Painter. Art and Literature is a wonderful world.

237Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Thu Mar 05 2020, 10:33

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
World Book Day today. Don't you dare Bob. I'm warning you.

238Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Thu Mar 05 2020, 15:02

Sluffy

Sluffy
Admin
@boltonbonce wrote:World Book Day today. Don't you dare Bob. I'm warning you.

if you aren't allowing accountancy then this is my nomination from my professional background instead -

Books. - Page 8 Introduction_to_company_law_-_davies

239Books. - Page 8 Empty Re: Books. on Thu Mar 05 2020, 15:27

Norpig

Norpig
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
If that book doesn't cure insomnia then nothing will  Laughing

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