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Brexit negotiations

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31 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 15:57

gloswhite

avatar
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
DK, so you not only decided to move to Germany, but have also planned to retire to Spain, and you still believe you should have a say in the future of the UK ? 

Not only that, but you criticize the older generation for all sorts of things. Since when has ageism been acceptable? My understanding is that it isn't, any more, (not forgetting that the older generation have already paid for what is currently available to them/us, and to which you are already laying claim to, i.e. pension).
If you had to move to Germany, all it shows is your career choices in the past, were not always as good as you thought.
You'll have a good life in Germany, much better than many many people in Britain, and its your choice, so stop whingeing, and get on with it.

32 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 16:08

Sluffy

avatar
Admin
@Dunkels King wrote:One last thing reference who should have been allowed a vote. In total 6 million people directly affected couldn't vote. That's 3 million ex-pats and 3 million EU Citizens already working in the UK, and we/they are directly affected, unlike many millions who this will have absolutely no effect on whatsoever, who got to vote on the futures of people like me.

To be fair the vast majority who voted (for Brexit or Remain) will still be living here for years to come and have to face the good or the bad of whatever is to come - so it is completely wrong to say it won't impact on their futures.

Of course it will - and if you choose to continue to live outside the country then it will obviously effect them (us) more than it ever will you, or other ex-pats - particularly if you continue the joys of being in the EU and us in the UK don't.

33 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 16:20

Dunkels King

avatar
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@Sluffy wrote:
@Dunkels King wrote:One last thing reference who should have been allowed a vote. In total 6 million people directly affected couldn't vote. That's 3 million ex-pats and 3 million EU Citizens already working in the UK, and we/they are directly affected, unlike many millions who this will have absolutely no effect on whatsoever, who got to vote on the futures of people like me.

To be fair the vast majority who voted (for Brexit or Remain) will still be living here for years to come and have to face the good or the bad of whatever is to come - so it is completely wrong to say it won't impact on their futures.

Of course it will - and if you choose to continue to live outside the country then it will obviously effect them (us) more than it ever will you, or other ex-pats - particularly if you continue the joys of being in the EU and us in the UK don't.

What joys of being in the EU ? Being able to stay in Germany forever or go back to the UK, because going to the other Countries to live or work will be out of the window. The impact I talk about is the freedom of movement around Europe that was guaranteed as part of being in the UK. Many ex-pats I work with and know socially based coming over here on that right to move around and go where the work is. I think you don't understand that British Citizens currently living in the EU (not the UK) have not been given a single assurance about what will happen regarding being allowed to stay in the Country they are in if they get made redundant, or if they can still continue to move around Europe. Nothing. Now that is what is shameful, because we are here knowing nothing. Imagine being in a situation were you have no idea if you will be entitled to support in the Country you have lived in for years and years if you lose your job because the goal posts got moved without you being permitted to have a say.

34 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 16:29

Sluffy

avatar
Admin
@Dunkels King wrote:
@Sluffy wrote:
@Dunkels King wrote:One last thing reference who should have been allowed a vote. In total 6 million people directly affected couldn't vote. That's 3 million ex-pats and 3 million EU Citizens already working in the UK, and we/they are directly affected, unlike many millions who this will have absolutely no effect on whatsoever, who got to vote on the futures of people like me.

To be fair the vast majority who voted (for Brexit or Remain) will still be living here for years to come and have to face the good or the bad of whatever is to come - so it is completely wrong to say it won't impact on their futures.

Of course it will - and if you choose to continue to live outside the country then it will obviously effect them (us) more than it ever will you, or other ex-pats - particularly if you continue the joys of being in the EU and us in the UK don't.

What joys of being in the EU ? Being able to stay in Germany forever or go back to the UK, because going to the other Countries to live or work will be out of the window. The impact I talk about is the freedom of movement around Europe that was guaranteed as part of being in the UK. Many ex-pats I work with and know socially based coming over here on that right to move around and go where the work is. I think you don't understand that British Citizens currently living in the EU (not the UK) have not been given a single assurance about what will happen regarding being allowed to stay in the Country they are in if they get made redundant, or if they can still continue to move around Europe. Nothing. Now that is what is shameful, because we are here knowing nothing. Imagine being in a situation were you have no idea if you will be entitled to support in the Country you have lived in for years and years if you lose your job because the goal posts got moved without you being permitted to have a say.

Two things.

People lived and worked abroad long before we ever joined the EU and they managed to go about it ok - what about non EU citizens that live and work in the EU now - they manage ok also.

Isn't the EU guaranteeing the same rights you enjoy now after Brexit as the UK is guaranteeing EU citizens who live and work here now, after Brexit? I thought they were, maybe I'm wrong?

35 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 16:31

Dunkels King

avatar
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@gloswhite wrote:DK, so you not only decided to move to Germany, but have also planned to retire to Spain, and you still believe you should have a say in the future of the UK ? 

Not only that, but you criticize the older generation for all sorts of things. Since when has ageism been acceptable? My understanding is that it isn't, any more, (not forgetting that the older generation have already paid for what is currently available to them/us, and to which you are already laying claim to, i.e. pension).
If you had to move to Germany, all it shows is your career choices in the past, were not always as good as you thought.
You'll have a good life in Germany, much better than many many people in Britain, and its your choice, so stop whingeing, and get on with it.

First thing, I am old so it's not ageist. But what I said is true, as was pointed out by someone else a while ago in much stronger terms. A lot of people who voted leave will not be affected. They are comfortable in the UK, never had any will to go to Europe (at least to live or work) and will before the next generation is out of shorts be off this mortal coil. It's not just the future of the UK. It's the future of it's Citizens, of which I am one, so I have every right to "whinge". Get on with what ? No one has any idea how we are going to get on. Nothing has been said what happens to us. If the Brexit decision had been based on truths then I couldn't complain, but in fact the result was based on more bullshit than a bullshit factory could produce in a hundred years.

Reference career paths. You could be right, but then again, the UK destroyed the industry I am in a long time ago and you know, it's not easy to take a financial hit to get retrained when you are getting on a bit, and I can't even begin to think of anything that was even being advertised around that time. I was in the Forces, then worked at Heathrow, then Manchester, couldn't get back in to Heathrow when Manchester scaled down, nor any other places. I had to put Bread on the table. Not the time to go on a new career path.

36 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 16:36

Dunkels King

avatar
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@Sluffy wrote:
@Dunkels King wrote:
@Sluffy wrote:
@Dunkels King wrote:One last thing reference who should have been allowed a vote. In total 6 million people directly affected couldn't vote. That's 3 million ex-pats and 3 million EU Citizens already working in the UK, and we/they are directly affected, unlike many millions who this will have absolutely no effect on whatsoever, who got to vote on the futures of people like me.

To be fair the vast majority who voted (for Brexit or Remain) will still be living here for years to come and have to face the good or the bad of whatever is to come - so it is completely wrong to say it won't impact on their futures.

Of course it will - and if you choose to continue to live outside the country then it will obviously effect them (us) more than it ever will you, or other ex-pats - particularly if you continue the joys of being in the EU and us in the UK don't.

What joys of being in the EU ? Being able to stay in Germany forever or go back to the UK, because going to the other Countries to live or work will be out of the window. The impact I talk about is the freedom of movement around Europe that was guaranteed as part of being in the UK. Many ex-pats I work with and know socially based coming over here on that right to move around and go where the work is. I think you don't understand that British Citizens currently living in the EU (not the UK) have not been given a single assurance about what will happen regarding being allowed to stay in the Country they are in if they get made redundant, or if they can still continue to move around Europe. Nothing. Now that is what is shameful, because we are here knowing nothing. Imagine being in a situation were you have no idea if you will be entitled to support in the Country you have lived in for years and years if you lose your job because the goal posts got moved without you being permitted to have a say.

Two things.

People lived and worked abroad long before we ever joined the EU and they managed to go about it ok - what about non EU citizens that live and work in the EU now - they manage ok also.

Isn't the EU guaranteeing the same rights you enjoy now after Brexit as the UK is guaranteeing EU citizens who live and work here now, after Brexit?  I thought they were, maybe I'm wrong?


In one word. No. Not a single thing has been guaranteed. Please point me to the documentation that says everything will be rosy and don't worry if you lose your job we will look after you and not boot you back to Blighty, but infact it doesn't exist. The first priority should always have been maintaining the rights of the affected people. The only right I know is that the UK said it would not be kicking people out and that they can register as residents or something. Amazing that because we are registered in Germany but we have had no information at all. In fact, one of the guys I work with called the Tax office in Leipzig last week because he was on a single mans tax (despite being married) and they actually told him "you are leaving the EU next year so you can stay on single person tax", and they weren't joking with him either.

Forgot to add. As a non EU Citizen you CAN still work in Europe. You need what is now known as a Blue Card. the problem is, under EU regulations (requested by the UK of course) you can not employ a person from a non EU Country (soon to be Britain) if another person from an EU Country is suitably qualified. In other words you will only get the job if no one from the other 27 EU Countries applied for it.

37 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 16:42

gloswhite

avatar
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
DK. Fair comments, about your career. Being ex Army, and having a specialist trade, I think I know where you're coming from. My own options were even more limited.
Just because were old farts, doesn't mean we can say what we like about age, colour, etc  Very Happy
Truths about Brexit were hard to come by from either side, also you ask about ex-pats, but seem to forget that everyone will suffer in some form or other, and from times when I lived abroad, the further from the UK I and my family were, the more we were sheltered from the more severe effects.
I do see your concerns, genuinely, but bear in mind that we will be subject to many other influences that you will not, e.g. price increases, etc.

38 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sat Sep 22 2018, 19:58

Natasha Whittam

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I think DK's had an internet breakdown. I hope he's ok.

By the way, did anyone see Nigel Farage in Bolton today? Apparently it was a sellout, not something you normally associate with Bolton.

I bet xmiles got his autograph.

39 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Sep 23 2018, 08:03

Dunkels King

avatar
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@gloswhite wrote:DK. Fair comments, about your career. Being ex Army, and having a specialist trade, I think I know where you're coming from. My own options were even more limited.
Just because were old farts, doesn't mean we can say what we like about age, colour, etc  Very Happy
Truths about Brexit were hard to come by from either side, also you ask about ex-pats, but seem to forget that everyone will suffer in some form or other, and from times when I lived abroad, the further from the UK I and my family were, the more we were sheltered from the more severe effects.
I do see your concerns, genuinely, but bear in mind that we will be subject to many other influences that you will not, e.g. price increases, etc.

Don't get me started on money Smile I am paid an hourly rate in GBP. as you can imagine with the pound sliding against most Currencies I am about 300 Euro per month worse off than I was before Brexit was announced. I hope it doesn't go too much further or I will have to stop bathing in Champagne.

40 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Sep 23 2018, 08:06

Dunkels King

avatar
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@Natasha Whittam wrote:I think DK's had an internet breakdown. I hope he's ok.

By the way, did anyone see Nigel Farage in Bolton today? Apparently it was a sellout, not something you normally associate with Bolton.

I bet xmiles got his autograph.

I'm fine Nat. Hope you are keeping warm in your Preston Penthouse. Don't worry about me. Enjoy your Sunday. Some of us have to work. Still, I am on day 11 of 14 so after today only 3 more days before I can get back to my family in Bavaria Smile

41 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Sep 23 2018, 14:59

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Natasha Whittam wrote:It's clear xmiles & wanderlust want our PM to roll over and do things to suit the EU.

Good on her for standing her ground. We're British, we don't let other countries dictate to us.

Xmiles & wanderlust should fuck off to France, it's clear they are kindred spirits.
May standing her ground? I thought she is selling out the Brexit dream or at least that is the message being delivered by half her party and the likes of your other hero Farage - not that anyone's listening to him if his empty bus tour and less than 1% electoral turn out in Bolton to support him in his hour of need is anything to go by.

So which Tory are you? The type that supports May or the type that says she is a sellout?

BTW you'll be delighted to know that I'd love to fuck off abroad, but despite having paid taxes into the British economy for 40 odd years, the Brexit devaluation of the pound means my state pension won't buy me a cup of coffee in Europe any more.

42 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Sep 23 2018, 15:34

Natasha Whittam

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@wanderlust wrote:
May standing her ground? I thought she is selling out the Brexit dream or at least that is the message being delivered by half her party and the likes of your other hero Farage - not that anyone's listening to him if his empty bus tour and less than 1% electoral turn out in Bolton to support him in his hour of need is anything to go by.

So which Tory are you? The type that supports May or the type that says she is a sellout?

BTW you'll be delighted to know that I'd love to fuck off abroad, but despite having paid taxes into the British economy for 40 odd years, the Brexit devaluation of the pound means my state pension won't buy me a cup of coffee in Europe any more.

I actually voted Labour at the last election which is well documented on here. I don't consider myself a Tory, on election day I vote for the party I feel is best at that moment in time. I'm not one of those fools who would vote Tory regardless of their policies, just because it's what their Dad did.

May is proving stronger than people gave her credit for. You yourself said she wouldn't be in charge come March 2019 - it's looking like she will.

43 Re: Brexit negotiations on Sun Sep 23 2018, 17:36

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
It’s not a sign of strength that the Tories haven’t tried to oust her yet, it just means they’re still more scared of a Corbyn government.

44 Re: Brexit negotiations on Mon Sep 24 2018, 12:00

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Natasha Whittam wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:
May standing her ground? I thought she is selling out the Brexit dream or at least that is the message being delivered by half her party and the likes of your other hero Farage - not that anyone's listening to him if his empty bus tour and less than 1% electoral turn out in Bolton to support him in his hour of need is anything to go by.

So which Tory are you? The type that supports May or the type that says she is a sellout?

BTW you'll be delighted to know that I'd love to fuck off abroad, but despite having paid taxes into the British economy for 40 odd years, the Brexit devaluation of the pound means my state pension won't buy me a cup of coffee in Europe any more.

I actually voted Labour at the last election which is well documented on here. I don't consider myself a Tory, on election day I vote for the party I feel is best at that moment in time. I'm not one of those fools who would vote Tory regardless of their policies, just because it's what their Dad did.

May is proving stronger than people gave her credit for. You yourself said she wouldn't be in charge come March 2019 - it's looking like she will.
Didn't you see the leaked document reported in the Mail and the Telegraph last week? Here's one version of the story.
It was ages ago when I first said I thought they'd get rid of her at the end of the negotiations, and whilst there remains a possibility of her staying on, at least there is now some evidence that her own party is out to get her although of course there's still some possibility that she might survive.

FYI I'm starting to err on the side of thinking that some sort of last-minute deal will be done with the EU rather than the dreaded no deal scenario. If my theory that the whole Brexit con is actually about UK power grabbing rather than EU membership turns out to be true (and it still looks like it is IMO) the international corporates than run the Tory party will need her to push through something at this stage - even if it totally unacceptable to the rank and file leave voters - in order to have a platform for their own agenda in the brouhaha that will inevitably follow.

I'm also expecting some sort of popularity-boosting announcement to be made by May's team at the upcoming Tory conference to try to steady the ship although I've no idea what that might be - other than desperate Smile 

If the UK public accept the deal May comes up with - and I'd be surprised if they do - there is perhaps a chance that she'll survive.

45 Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Sep 25 2018, 10:19

gloswhite

avatar
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
I have to say that May has lasted remarkably well, even though she doesn't seem to have a credible plan in place.
Having said that, when you take a step back, and look at our esteemed MP's, you have to wonder what the hell are they playing at. May is rattling down the track, and heading for the buffers, whilst Corbyn, even at this late stage still cannot decide what he wants to do.
Personally, I think our politicians have let us down badly, but I shouldn't be surprised really, as they haven't had to make any big decisions for some years, (about 40 I think  Very Happy)
When this is over were going to have either a government that cannot put the country first, to one that is trying to put its leader first. 
Its going to be chaotic when all this Brexit stupidity is over, and do the current bunch really think we will just carry on as before, now that we've seen their true capabilities ?

46 Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Sep 25 2018, 10:23

gloswhite

avatar
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@Dunkels King wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:DK. Fair comments, about your career. Being ex Army, and having a specialist trade, I think I know where you're coming from. My own options were even more limited.
Just because were old farts, doesn't mean we can say what we like about age, colour, etc  Very Happy
Truths about Brexit were hard to come by from either side, also you ask about ex-pats, but seem to forget that everyone will suffer in some form or other, and from times when I lived abroad, the further from the UK I and my family were, the more we were sheltered from the more severe effects.
I do see your concerns, genuinely, but bear in mind that we will be subject to many other influences that you will not, e.g. price increases, etc.

Don't get me started on money Smile I am paid an hourly rate in GBP. as you can imagine with the pound sliding against most Currencies I am about 300 Euro per month worse off than I was before Brexit was announced. I hope it doesn't go too much further or I will have to stop bathing in Champagne.
I can't think of anything worse  Very Happy
I had the same problem a few years ago when GBP were translated to Cyprus Pounds, but certainly not as big a drop as yours. Having said that, they had to introduce a new allowance, just to make up the difference.
Whatever the outcome, I hope it all goes smoothly for you.

47 Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Sep 25 2018, 12:29

xmiles

avatar
Ivan Campo
Ivan Campo
@gloswhite wrote:I have to say that May has lasted remarkably well, even though she doesn't seem to have a credible plan in place.
Having said that, when you take a step back, and look at our esteemed MP's, you have to wonder what the hell are they playing at. May is rattling down the track, and heading for the buffers, whilst Corbyn, even at this late stage still cannot decide what he wants to do.
Personally, I think our politicians have let us down badly, but I shouldn't be surprised really, as they haven't had to make any big decisions for some years, (about 40 I think  Very Happy)
When this is over were going to have either a government that cannot put the country first, to one that is trying to put its leader first. 
Its going to be chaotic when all this Brexit stupidity is over, and do the current bunch really think we will just carry on as before, now that we've seen their true capabilities ?

A very depressing prospect for which we have to thank Cameron, although if most of the press hadn't been so fanatically hostile to the EU over the years and made up so many lies about the EU maybe Cameron wouldn't have felt the need to call a referendum.

48 Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Sep 25 2018, 14:20

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@gloswhite wrote:
When this is over were going to have either a government that cannot put the country first, or one that is trying to put its leader first. 
Its going to be chaotic when all this Brexit stupidity is over, and do the current bunch really think we will just carry on as before, now that we've seen their true capabilities ?
I've always thought that the whole thing is a power struggle, but to some extent the "leaders" are no more than puppets of the corporate funders. Corporates - notably British corporates like the East India Company in the early days and the global superpowers more recently - have always bought and sold "leaders" around the world and it saddens me that it's now happening to us.
They don't get to be trillionaires by being thick, and convincing the British people that they have some sort of control when in fact they have none is a brilliant albeit well-used strategy pioneered by the British in colonial times. The role of the leave campaign was merely to endorse their money-making plans in a global economy IMO and we have effectively ceded control instead of "taking it back", made worse by the fact that we are about to lose the protection of the EU trading bloc.
Frankly it doesn't matter who the token figurehead is any more as they'll do as they're told and will get well looked after for it.
Britain got rich, fat and lazy and was ripe for the picking and any thoughts that our democracy would be our strength has now gone out of the window - most of us still have a vote, but what use is that when they have been given consensus to decide what we can actually vote on?

49 Re: Brexit negotiations on Wed Sep 26 2018, 14:35

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse

50 Re: Brexit negotiations on Wed Sep 26 2018, 16:58

gloswhite

avatar
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
Quite a bit of truth in there Wander. The big conglomerates have held sway over far too much, ranging from money, to influencing public opinion or behaviour. This is shown best by Facebook, which is happily ignoring all peoples, governments, (and income tax), in its scramble to make money.

51 Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Sep 27 2018, 01:45

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@gloswhite wrote:Quite a bit of truth in there Wander. The big conglomerates have held sway over far too much, ranging from money, to influencing public opinion or behaviour. This is shown best by Facebook, which is happily ignoring all peoples, governments, (and income tax), in its scramble to make money.

It's all speculation Glos but it depends on which way you look at it and it could be argued that there hasn't been anything to show it isn't happening.
However those with a global spread of investments have least to lose and potentially most to gain from stirring up the markets with cons like Brextheeconomy and have the wherewithal to make it happen via companies like Cambridge Analytica and the media barons so it's only a short step to wielding the balance of power - which I think they do already.
I just wonder if they in turn have sympathies for or deals with foreign powers who would also benefit from our destabilisation? We'll probably  never know.

52 Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Sep 27 2018, 17:50

gloswhite

avatar
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@wanderlust wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:Quite a bit of truth in there Wander. The big conglomerates have held sway over far too much, ranging from money, to influencing public opinion or behaviour. This is shown best by Facebook, which is happily ignoring all peoples, governments, (and income tax), in its scramble to make money.

It's all speculation Glos but it depends on which way you look at it and it could be argued that there hasn't been anything to show it isn't happening.
However those with a global spread of investments have least to lose and potentially most to gain from stirring up the markets with cons like Brextheeconomy and have the wherewithal to make it happen via companies like Cambridge Analytica and the media barons so it's only a short step to wielding the balance of power - which I think they do already.
I just wonder if they in turn have sympathies for or deals with foreign powers who would also benefit from our destabilisation? We'll probably  never know.
Someone, somewhere will overstep the mark, (such as Russia and the Novichock), and its important that they are brought to book. 
Personally, politics apart, I think this government has done well in pursuing the Russian state for this outrage. However, it looks, like most things, that interest is on the wane, with, yet again, nobody being punished.

53 Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Sep 27 2018, 18:04

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Interestingly, the USA Federal Reserve today dropped their accommodative monetary policy causing share prices to rise on Wall St notably technology shares. In essence an accommodative policy makes it easier and cheaper for businesses to borrow money which has the effects of increasing employment but suppressing interest rates for savers. Central banks tend to use it when there is a downturn in order to stimulate the economy. 
Today's move will strengthen American businesses but the risk is that it will cause inflation.
Mark Carney at the Bank of England has operated an accommodative policy for some years now so it will be interesting to see if the BoE follows suit as British companies continue to underperform whilst investors remain skeptical about Brexit. The BoE is sitting on reserves of £485 billion so there's plenty of room for manoeuvre if they want to try to match the Americans however it might get pissed away until Brexit is sorted one way or the other and inflation is under control so I'm not banking on getting a decent return on my savings just yet. Plus the Government would be against it whilst the accommodative policy is propping up artificially high employment figures. I'm sure the BoE would like to do it to keep British businesses competitive, but with the exit debacle hanging around it's just not the right time.
Perfect timing by the Americans to take advantage of our mess though...

54 Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Sep 27 2018, 20:40

Natasha Whittam

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@wanderlust wrote:Interestingly,

That's where I stopped reading because I knew it wasn't going to be.

55 Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Sep 28 2018, 09:46

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Natasha Whittam wrote:
@wanderlust wrote:Interestingly,

That's where I stopped reading because I knew it wasn't going to be.
That's where you stopped reading what?

56 Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Sep 28 2018, 11:08

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Today's Government stats for the quarter.

GDP growth down to 0.1% - and annual forecast now revised down to 1.2% (compared to 2.1% for the EU and 2.6% for the US)

UK inflation at 2.7%

UK business investment fell by 0.7%

No chance of the accommodative policy being dropped any time soon.

57 Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Sep 28 2018, 11:21

Natasha Whittam

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
What's that got to do with Brexit?

58 Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Sep 28 2018, 11:32

wanderlust

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Natasha Whittam wrote:What's that got to do with Brexit?
Interestingly..... it's in the interesting article above that you didn't read.

59 Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Sep 28 2018, 13:12

xmiles

avatar
Ivan Campo
Ivan Campo
@wanderlust wrote:
@Natasha Whittam wrote:What's that got to do with Brexit?
Interestingly..... it's in the interesting article above that you didn't read.

Laughing

60 Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Sep 28 2018, 13:14

Natasha Whittam

avatar
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I've just read it. It wasn't interesting.

I feel cheated.

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