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Boris Johnson to be our next Prime Minister?

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xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@Angry Dad wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@rammywhite wrote:This whole situation worries me. We have a PM who's career to date is hallmarked by buffoonery. To me he has no gravitas and I can't take him seriously. Even his 'acceptance' speech was infantile with nonsense about 'dudes' and a lot of silly hand waving.
I can't see him persuading the other 27 EU members to take him that seriously either so the chances of a no-deal(catastrophic) Brexit have increased.
As for a GE-  that's a nightmare scenario. Both Labour  and the Tories are polling badly (at around 20%). Jo Swinsons Lib Dems and Brexit will seriously damage both the main parties votes and Scotland will revert to about 50 SNP members. So we will have a seriously hung parliament where it will need a triple alliance ( like Corbyn/Sturgeon/Swinson) to rule jointly. Or it could be  a joint alliance with Johnson/Farage and the shadow of Trump in the background tweeting away. 
Both are nightmare scenarios . The idea of the likes of Farage holding a cabinet seat, a major seat of office, is almost too hard to contemplate.
I think we are in for a very rough ride.
 Cameron should be chemically castrated for creating this chaos.

Pretty much sums up how I feel. Sad

You lot want him to fail if he does you will be very happy if he does well you will be very unhappy, what a pathetic shower you are.

Not as pathetic as voting for something that will seriously damage this country whilst deluding yourself that you are a patriot.

Angry Dad

Angry Dad
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@xmiles wrote:
@Angry Dad wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@rammywhite wrote:This whole situation worries me. We have a PM who's career to date is hallmarked by buffoonery. To me he has no gravitas and I can't take him seriously. Even his 'acceptance' speech was infantile with nonsense about 'dudes' and a lot of silly hand waving.
I can't see him persuading the other 27 EU members to take him that seriously either so the chances of a no-deal(catastrophic) Brexit have increased.
As for a GE-  that's a nightmare scenario. Both Labour  and the Tories are polling badly (at around 20%). Jo Swinsons Lib Dems and Brexit will seriously damage both the main parties votes and Scotland will revert to about 50 SNP members. So we will have a seriously hung parliament where it will need a triple alliance ( like Corbyn/Sturgeon/Swinson) to rule jointly. Or it could be  a joint alliance with Johnson/Farage and the shadow of Trump in the background tweeting away. 
Both are nightmare scenarios . The idea of the likes of Farage holding a cabinet seat, a major seat of office, is almost too hard to contemplate.
I think we are in for a very rough ride.
 Cameron should be chemically castrated for creating this chaos.

Pretty much sums up how I feel. Sad

You lot want him to fail if he does you will be very happy if he does well you will be very unhappy, what a pathetic shower you are.

Not as pathetic as voting for something that will seriously damage this country whilst deluding yourself that you are a patriot.
You are a defeatist, Europe is doomed, we are getting out before the crash, Boris will do just fine ,I am an opitimist and i am very confidant about leaving, go Boris.

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
The issues is AD, apart from his Brexit views you don’t know much about him or his policies - or seem to care either. He’s a single issue politician, with a history of lies, whose failed in the other major public roles he’s held.

There are plenty of good reasons to be nervous about him.

Angry Dad

Angry Dad
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@T.R.O.Y wrote:The issues is AD, apart from his Brexit views you don’t know much about him or his policies - or seem to care either. He’s a single issue politician, with a history of lies, whose failed in the other major public roles he’s held.

There are plenty of good reasons to be nervous about him.
Boris does not worry me at all, Hunt would have, i am fine with Boris if he takes us out without a deal i'm cool with that in fact i'd prefer it i don't see those euro twat's getting away with treating him like shit as they did with mayday. They are shitting themselves now and like trump he will say fuck you. My bet is they will change their tune with him.I expect to see a resounding Tory win at the next GE and Labour wiped out.There is a reason why they backed Boris it will become clear soon enough.

Angry Dad

Angry Dad
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
What a great start just what was needed.

karlypants

karlypants
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Angry Dad wrote:What a great start just what was needed.
Yes! Hunt, Grayling and Mordaunt gone for starters!  cheers

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
Whatever happens, its good to see someone with  optimism.  

For far too long we've had people, some on here as well, who have peddled nothing but doom and gloom. I often wondered if they realised that showing such a face to the outside world would do us no good, and in fact, would damage us in the longer term.
The bottom line is that our dishonest and self-promoting politicians have reneged on a perfectly legal promise to the country, and in doing so have put the country in the most difficult situation it has been in for many many decades. Self-centered and foolish as they were, some believed they knew better than their own constituents, and the majority of the public. As a result, and at all levels, this country is in a state of stagnation, and at the bargaining mercy of the EU.
Although many don't want to hear it, to get out of this ludicrous situation, we need an unconventional solution, and I believe Boris will at least try to provide this. So all you doom mongers, just give an enlightened outlook a try, and you never know, we might find a way for all of us to get out from under this mess. Good luck to Boris, there's a lot riding on him to succeed.

It has often been said that one of the UK's most successful businessmen, Richard Branson, wasn't particularly good at business, however he was extremely good at picking the right tactics, and the right team to carry them out. I believe Boris works much the same way.

karlypants

karlypants
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@gloswhite wrote:Whatever happens, its good to see someone with  optimism.  

For far too long we've had people, some on here as well, who have peddled nothing but doom and gloom. I often wondered if they realised that showing such a face to the outside world would do us no good, and in fact, would damage us in the longer term.
The bottom line is that our dishonest and self-promoting politicians have reneged on a perfectly legal promise to the country, and in doing so have put the country in the most difficult situation it has been in for many many decades. Self-centered and foolish as they were, some believed they knew better than their own constituents, and the majority of the public. As a result, and at all levels, this country is in a state of stagnation, and at the bargaining mercy of the EU.
Although many don't want to hear it, to get out of this ludicrous situation, we need an unconventional solution, and I believe Boris will at least try to provide this. So all you doom mongers, just give an enlightened outlook a try, and you never know, we might find a way for all of us to get out from under this mess. Good luck to Boris, there's a lot riding on him to succeed.

It has often been said that one of the UK's most successful businessmen, Richard Branson, wasn't particularly good at business, however he was extremely good at picking the right tactics, and the right team to carry them out. I believe Boris works much the same way.

Well said Glos! :clap: :clap: :clap:

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I'm looking forward to this.

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
Ha optimism is all we’re left clinging to - and remainers are being blamed for the state that attempting Brexit has got us into, ridiculous.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@gloswhite wrote:Whatever happens, its good to see someone with  optimism.  

For far too long we've had people, some on here as well, who have peddled nothing but doom and gloom. I often wondered if they realised that showing such a face to the outside world would do us no good, and in fact, would damage us in the longer term.
The bottom line is that our dishonest and self-promoting politicians have reneged on a perfectly legal promise to the country, and in doing so have put the country in the most difficult situation it has been in for many many decades. Self-centered and foolish as they were, some believed they knew better than their own constituents, and the majority of the public. As a result, and at all levels, this country is in a state of stagnation, and at the bargaining mercy of the EU.
Although many don't want to hear it, to get out of this ludicrous situation, we need an unconventional solution, and I believe Boris will at least try to provide this. So all you doom mongers, just give an enlightened outlook a try, and you never know, we might find a way for all of us to get out from under this mess. Good luck to Boris, there's a lot riding on him to succeed.

It has often been said that one of the UK's most successful businessmen, Richard Branson, wasn't particularly good at business, however he was extremely good at picking the right tactics, and the right team to carry them out. I believe Boris works much the same way.

It is voting leave without knowing what that meant that has caused the mess you describe and how many times does it have to be pointed out that 37% is not "the majority of the public"?

Just because Boris thinks he can walk on water doesn't mean he can no matter how optimistic he is. Given his track record of serial dishonesty I am surprised you believe in him. He even lies when he doesn't need to. Why lie about kippers when he was already certain to win the Tory leadership vote? https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jul/18/boris-johnson-claims-about-kippers-fishy-brussels-says

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@T.R.O.Y wrote:Ha optimism is all we’re left clinging to - and remainers are being blamed for the state that attempting Brexit has got us into, ridiculous.
100% correct. Remainers are at fault. Although I have to say, as the Leavers didn't expect to win the referendum, they were disorganised initially, which led to some very strange comments, and views, being made.
You have/had the right to complain, etc, but to do it in such a vitriolic and dishonest way, wasn't good for you or your cause. Lets not forget the scaremongering and insults throughout the campaign, along with the manipulation of laws, (some as old as 300(?) years), and in the case of some politicians, Blair for example, siding with the EU leaders, to actively coach them in how parliament would behave.
The sad thing is that the self-centered idiots in Parliament still cannot see what damage they have done. or can still do.
I have always believed that it is better to make a decision, right or wrong, than make none at all. If wrong, it can be corrected, if right, the plan is working.

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:Whatever happens, its good to see someone with  optimism.  

For far too long we've had people, some on here as well, who have peddled nothing but doom and gloom. I often wondered if they realised that showing such a face to the outside world would do us no good, and in fact, would damage us in the longer term.
The bottom line is that our dishonest and self-promoting politicians have reneged on a perfectly legal promise to the country, and in doing so have put the country in the most difficult situation it has been in for many many decades. Self-centered and foolish as they were, some believed they knew better than their own constituents, and the majority of the public. As a result, and at all levels, this country is in a state of stagnation, and at the bargaining mercy of the EU.
Although many don't want to hear it, to get out of this ludicrous situation, we need an unconventional solution, and I believe Boris will at least try to provide this. So all you doom mongers, just give an enlightened outlook a try, and you never know, we might find a way for all of us to get out from under this mess. Good luck to Boris, there's a lot riding on him to succeed.

It has often been said that one of the UK's most successful businessmen, Richard Branson, wasn't particularly good at business, however he was extremely good at picking the right tactics, and the right team to carry them out. I believe Boris works much the same way.

It is voting leave without knowing what that meant that has caused the mess you describe and how many times does it have to be pointed out that 37% is not "the majority of the public"?

Just because Boris thinks he can walk on water doesn't mean he can no matter how optimistic he is. Given his track record of serial dishonesty I am surprised you believe in him. He even lies when he doesn't need to. Why lie about kippers when he was already certain to win the Tory leadership vote? https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jul/18/boris-johnson-claims-about-kippers-fishy-brussels-says
XM, you're doing it again. Grabbing hold of insignificant facts and trying to make them appear important. I doubt anyone, or very few at least, know or care about the 37%. Its done, gone, and best forgotten. Emotive comments such as Boris walking on water don't help either.
I understand your frustration, especially as you so obviously believe in what you say, but don't you think we've reached another very important point in the process, where we now have to see where this Parliament takes us, and rather than refusing everything likely to come out of it, actually consider possible outcomes, and seeing what can be made of them, for the benefit of all ?

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
As and aside, I don't have complete faith in Boris by any means, but at least he's trying to get a result, and in the meantime, keeping Parliaments promise to the people.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:Whatever happens, its good to see someone with  optimism.  

For far too long we've had people, some on here as well, who have peddled nothing but doom and gloom. I often wondered if they realised that showing such a face to the outside world would do us no good, and in fact, would damage us in the longer term.
The bottom line is that our dishonest and self-promoting politicians have reneged on a perfectly legal promise to the country, and in doing so have put the country in the most difficult situation it has been in for many many decades. Self-centered and foolish as they were, some believed they knew better than their own constituents, and the majority of the public. As a result, and at all levels, this country is in a state of stagnation, and at the bargaining mercy of the EU.
Although many don't want to hear it, to get out of this ludicrous situation, we need an unconventional solution, and I believe Boris will at least try to provide this. So all you doom mongers, just give an enlightened outlook a try, and you never know, we might find a way for all of us to get out from under this mess. Good luck to Boris, there's a lot riding on him to succeed.

It has often been said that one of the UK's most successful businessmen, Richard Branson, wasn't particularly good at business, however he was extremely good at picking the right tactics, and the right team to carry them out. I believe Boris works much the same way.

It is voting leave without knowing what that meant that has caused the mess you describe and how many times does it have to be pointed out that 37% is not "the majority of the public"?

Just because Boris thinks he can walk on water doesn't mean he can no matter how optimistic he is. Given his track record of serial dishonesty I am surprised you believe in him. He even lies when he doesn't need to. Why lie about kippers when he was already certain to win the Tory leadership vote? https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jul/18/boris-johnson-claims-about-kippers-fishy-brussels-says
XM, you're doing it again. Grabbing hold of insignificant facts and trying to make them appear important. I doubt anyone, or very few at least, know or care about the 37%. Its done, gone, and best forgotten. Emotive comments such as Boris walking on water don't help either.
I understand your frustration, especially as you so obviously believe in what you say, but don't you think we've reached another very important point in the process, where we now have to see where this Parliament takes us, and rather than refusing everything likely to come out of it, actually consider possible outcomes, and seeing what can be made of them, for the benefit of all ?

It is not an insignificant fact that only a minority of the population voted for brexit. It is a clear contradiction of your claim that "the majority of the public" want brexit.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@gloswhite wrote:
@T.R.O.Y wrote:Ha optimism is all we’re left clinging to - and remainers are being blamed for the state that attempting Brexit has got us into, ridiculous.
100% correct. Remainers are at fault.
I have always believed that it is better to make a decision, right or wrong, than make none at all. If wrong, it can be corrected, if right, the plan is working.

"100% correct. Remainers are at fault." Are you serious or are you being ironic?

Like you I believe it is important to be decisive provided wrong decisions can be corrected but leaving the EU is not a decision that can be easily reversed. What most brexiteers fail to understand is that we have many concessions and opt outs that would not be available to us if we re-applied to join, for example a large rebate on our contributions and retaining the pound sterling.

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
How is optimism, or positivity going to solve the Irish backstop issue?

Laughable to claim remainers got us into this mess, it’s leavers fantasies and only that. Take some responsibility, don’t deflect.

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
I believe that immediately after the referendum the Leavers actually thought they had won, and there was very little they had to do other than tidy up the loose ends. How wrong they were ! However, in the vacuum, the Remainers stepped, moaning, arguing, betraying promises, and generally making a dogs dinner of any and every attempt to reach some sort of agreement. Of course the Leavers were slow to the party, and when they joined, things got worse. They were not only trying to defend or express sometimes poorly put arguments, but were reeling from personal abuse and character assassinations by the Remainers. A very difficult uphill slog. Both sides polarised very quickly, becoming entrenched in their own personal views and remedies, with no room for compromise. Every politician had their own view, and nobody would alter it. 
Although a lot of the current situation still remains, we now have an opportunity to change it. I only hope Parliament is allowed at least a chance at this, without being stifled by those remainers who know what they don't want, have no idea on how to fix this stalemate, and are not prepared to do anythng other than go against the referendum, and bend the knee to Europe.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@gloswhite wrote:I believe that immediately after the referendum the Leavers actually thought they had won, and there was very little they had to do other than tidy up the loose ends. How wrong they were ! However, in the vacuum, the Remainers stepped, moaning, arguing, betraying promises, and generally making a dogs dinner of any and every attempt to reach some sort of agreement. Of course the Leavers were slow to the party, and when they joined, things got worse. They were not only trying to defend or express sometimes poorly put arguments, but were reeling from personal abuse and character assassinations by the Remainers. A very difficult uphill slog. Both sides polarised very quickly, becoming entrenched in their own personal views and remedies, with no room for compromise. Every politician had their own view, and nobody would alter it. 
Although a lot of the current situation still remains, we now have an opportunity to change it. I only hope Parliament is allowed at least a chance at this, without being stifled by those remainers who know what they don't want, have no idea on how to fix this stalemate, and are not prepared to do anythng other than go against the referendum, and bend the knee to Europe.

Using a phrase like "bend the knee to Europe" is so ridiculous. Remainers are not bending their knees by wanting to continue to enjoy the benefits of remaining in the EU. Whilst we are members we are in no way subservient to the EU. This has been pointed out many times. You appear to prefer the lies spouted by Boris rather than the evidence (for example his recent lies about kippers).

And you have the gall to accuse me of "making emotive comments"!

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
There’s only been one agreement on offer - May’s deal. Are you honestly suggesting remainers alone ruined that Glos?

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:I believe that immediately after the referendum the Leavers actually thought they had won, and there was very little they had to do other than tidy up the loose ends. How wrong they were ! However, in the vacuum, the Remainers stepped, moaning, arguing, betraying promises, and generally making a dogs dinner of any and every attempt to reach some sort of agreement. Of course the Leavers were slow to the party, and when they joined, things got worse. They were not only trying to defend or express sometimes poorly put arguments, but were reeling from personal abuse and character assassinations by the Remainers. A very difficult uphill slog. Both sides polarised very quickly, becoming entrenched in their own personal views and remedies, with no room for compromise. Every politician had their own view, and nobody would alter it. 
Although a lot of the current situation still remains, we now have an opportunity to change it. I only hope Parliament is allowed at least a chance at this, without being stifled by those remainers who know what they don't want, have no idea on how to fix this stalemate, and are not prepared to do anythng other than go against the referendum, and bend the knee to Europe.

Using a phrase like "bend the knee to Europe" is so ridiculous. Remainers are not bending their knees by wanting to continue to enjoy the benefits of remaining in the EU. Whilst we are members we are in no way subservient to the EU. This has been pointed out many times. You appear to prefer the lies spouted by Boris rather than the evidence (for example his recent lies about kippers).

And you have the gall to accuse me of "making emotive comments"!
Very Happy   I thought you might bridle at that knee comment.
The truth is, to enjoy the benefits of remaining in the EU, you have to live by their rules. Its as simple as that. 
So saying that you are in no way subservient does seem a little odd to me.

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@T.R.O.Y wrote:There’s only been one agreement on offer - May’s deal. Are you honestly suggesting remainers alone ruined that Glos?
No, in fairness TROY, May ruined that one by nodding everything through without too much thought. What the remainers did, in my view, was to stop every attempt to recover from the situation, whilst pushing for their own personal views/gains, often saying they're doing it for the benefit of the country, when, in fact, they were damaging the image and reputation of the oldest and most respected of Parliament..

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
I’d argue you can’t accuse remain MPs of that and not those pushing leave. Both have acted in their own self interests, this remain/leave polarisation needs to end, we need a solution. Not much choice but to see what Boris comes back with - although I reiterate positivity from remainers wouldn’t have changed anything and won’t affect the Irish backstop. This needs thought and diplomacy.

rammywhite

rammywhite
Frank Worthington
Frank Worthington
Glos,
You say that remainers became entrenched with no room for compromise.
What compromise was possible? The referendum was either IN or OUT. People voted on that basis.
If ,as a remainer ,you had firm views and bore  in mind the 17 odd million who voted Remain why should you compromise on a decision like this. It was a  referendum, not legally binding and it was Cameron who said that he would stick by the result. He had NO right say that. Parliament makes laws- not prime ministers.
And as for bending the knee to 'their' laws. They're our laws as well as we're still a member and have a say in what laws are passed.

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@gloswhite wrote:
@xmiles wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:I believe that immediately after the referendum the Leavers actually thought they had won, and there was very little they had to do other than tidy up the loose ends. How wrong they were ! However, in the vacuum, the Remainers stepped, moaning, arguing, betraying promises, and generally making a dogs dinner of any and every attempt to reach some sort of agreement. Of course the Leavers were slow to the party, and when they joined, things got worse. They were not only trying to defend or express sometimes poorly put arguments, but were reeling from personal abuse and character assassinations by the Remainers. A very difficult uphill slog. Both sides polarised very quickly, becoming entrenched in their own personal views and remedies, with no room for compromise. Every politician had their own view, and nobody would alter it. 
Although a lot of the current situation still remains, we now have an opportunity to change it. I only hope Parliament is allowed at least a chance at this, without being stifled by those remainers who know what they don't want, have no idea on how to fix this stalemate, and are not prepared to do anythng other than go against the referendum, and bend the knee to Europe.

Using a phrase like "bend the knee to Europe" is so ridiculous. Remainers are not bending their knees by wanting to continue to enjoy the benefits of remaining in the EU. Whilst we are members we are in no way subservient to the EU. This has been pointed out many times. You appear to prefer the lies spouted by Boris rather than the evidence (for example his recent lies about kippers).

And you have the gall to accuse me of "making emotive comments"!
Very Happy   I thought you might bridle at that knee comment.
The truth is, to enjoy the benefits of remaining in the EU, you have to live by their rules. Its as simple as that. 
So saying that you are in no way subservient does seem a little odd to me.

As rammy has already pointed out as we're still a member we have a say in what laws are passed.

If we are subservient why did we not adopt the Euro?

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
Good points chaps, however, I believe the remainers took their responses to the extreme too quickly, becoming entrenched, using every means at their disposal, even archaic laws, in such a way that it was almost impossible to change, something the egotists of parliament couldn't consider.
I agree that people would, could, and should, argue their point, but they should also be prepared to compromise. This wasn't forthcoming from either side, especially the remainers, although I would say that because the remainers had nothing to lose and everything to gain, (from their point of view), they were the more vociferous, and most inflexible, and using some very dubious tactics.
Although some believe that this referendum is/was 'illegal', let us not forget that it was subsequently voted on by all of Parliament, at a time they could have said no, but which was passed, and committed to, unanimously. It became law some time ago now, and one that all those self same politicians are now reneging on. I would say that their actions are the real dishonest ones.
As this is such a fast moving situation, I tend not to worry too much what has happened to get us to where we are, although learning lessons on the way is important. I genuinely feel that we need to focus on whats about to happen, and actually consider the events to come.
Both sides feel let down, for whatever reasons, and the root cause to my mind is the behaviour  and chicanery of the politicians. They've dug a big hole for us, and have the gall to ask that we decide how to get them out, by suggesting a second referendum. Ludicrous.
Like him or not, Marmite Boris has already made more big decisions in two days than the whole of the May government. Only time will show whether he is the right person for the job, but right now, at least, he's getting government working again. I just hope that his efforts aren't ruined by those politicians already plotting his downfall, and I ask 'for what reason' ?

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
XM:

As rammy has already pointed out as we're still a member we have a say in what laws are passed. 

If we are subservient why did we not adopt the Euro?



Simple really, at the time we not only had the political will, but also the political standing to make our demands stick. Although I'm sure the cost of doing so also played a part.

T.R.O.Y


Andy Walker
Andy Walker
So if our political will was not to be a part of the Euro, surely that entirely disproves your original point?

Should we end up getting a trade deal with the US which pushes common rules/standards, will you then be complaining we are subservient to them?

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@T.R.O.Y wrote:So if our political will was not to be a part of the Euro, surely that entirely disproves your original point?

Should we end up getting a trade deal with the US which pushes common rules/standards, will you then be complaining we are subservient to them?
We've been on our knees in front of the United States for years. If we suck any harder our heads will cave in.

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@T.R.O.Y wrote:So if our political will was not to be a part of the Euro, surely that entirely disproves your original point?

Should we end up getting a trade deal with the US which pushes common rules/standards, will you then be complaining we are subservient to them?
No, that was before the referendum, and a completely different political landscape.
Unlike the EU, the USA cannot interfere with our laws, whereas the EU, until the end of October, still can, although, as Bonce points out, we do have a 'close' relationship with USA  Smile . Another big difference is that any deals will be negotiated, I'm assuming, without any 'backstop' type agreement.
We all know that international politics/trade at such a level will call on all and any points/issues that will influence the deal in their favour. After all, we've seen it applied quite severely by the EU. On that basis I expect negotiations with the USA to be more amicable, although the arm twisting and wheeling and dealing will be just as intense. We already work really well with the Americans on many levels, as we do with the Europeans, however, I feel we will be competing more with our close neighbours than we are the USA. Also, our reputation for food and working standards are well known, and hard earned. I cannot see these being negotiated away, just for a quick deal. Lets not forget that we are a relatively rich and powerful country, and have some leeway in what we can offer and accept.

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